Scallop

Pecten maximus

The scallop is a living mollusc that is buried several tens of meters under the sandy bottom. This filter-feeding animal feeds on plankton.

Fishing is regulated in France; the minimum authorised size is between 10 and 11 cm depending on the fishing areas and it can be sold certified: Red Label and MSC.

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Les caractéristiques

Robe
  • Bivalve: two ribbed valves. One is flat and the other is convex.
  • Red to brown colour
Palais
  • Cooked: fried, roasted, poached
  • Raw: ceviche, carpaccio, sashimi
Chair
  • Lean and tasty
  • Rich in protein

Saisonnalité

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To preserve the resource, fishing is allowed from October to May in France.
Découvrez le calendrier des saisons

Dans l'assiette

Raw or cooked, scallops are an affordable product and it is frequently present on tables during the end of the year celebrations. Quick cooking over a low heat preserves its flavor and smoothness.

This product is composed of a white part, the walnut, and depending on the season, an orange part, the coral. Scallops are high in protein and low in fat; its nutritional value varies according to the presence or absence of coral.

Live scallops can be kept for 2 days in the refrigerator. To ensure that it is alive before consumption, it is necessary to check that the shell closes quickly to the touch.

Mainly sold as nuts on the French markets, the yield is 15 to 20% on a whole shell.


© Crédit photo : Gault et millau 2019 - Dish by David Le quellec - Chef of Moulin Rouge in France

zones de pêche

In Europe, scallop fishing is carried out in the English Channel, Celtic Seas and the Bay of Biscay.

In France, the fishing areas are mainly Granville Bay and Seine Bay in Normandy, and Erquy Bay in Brittany.


Techniques de pêche



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